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Venezuela - Naval Flags - Part 1

Last modified: 2011-11-19 by zoltán horváth
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See also:


Armada de Venezuela


image by Guillermo T. Aveledo, 19 December 1999

The Navy (Armada de Venezuela ) flag is the Coat of Arms of the Navy, on a blue field.
Guillermo T. Aveledo, 19 December 1999

According to Lacasadelasbanderas.com, there is an inscription on the flag.
Dov Gutterman, 23 June 2001


Naval Ensign

(2:3)
image by Pascal Gross, 13 December 2006

The naval ensign of Venezuela is the national flag with the Coat of Arms in the upper left corner.
Source: Christian Fogd Pedersen - Flaggor i färg, 1973 [ped73].
Marcus Wendel , 15 September 1999

The huge flag depicted on a picture of the School Ship A.R.V. "Simon Bolivar" is used for special ocasions. According to the Diccionario Enciclopedico Ilustrado de la Lengua Espanola Sopena (Barcelona, 1954), this flag fall under the name of "bandera de combate" or 'combat flag'. I translate the term: a national flag, very large sized, which hoisted over the stern of warships when they go into battle or in very solemn events. As of today, Venezuelan ensings have larger and bolder stars, so as to be seen from afar and not be confused with Colombian or Ecuatorian flags.
Guillermo Aveledo, 29 September 2000

Pre-2006 Ensign

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 18 August 2003

See also: National and State Flag


Naval Jack

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 20 August 2003

Torrotito/Venezuelan Jack - According to the Naval Ceremonial and Protocol Regulations number MAN-EC-CGA-0001-B effective since July 1st, 1997.
Raul Orta, 18 May 2002

According to Album 2000 Corr. 3 [pay03] - Jack (2:3) - Blue flag with white fouled anchor and severn fivepointed stars in an arc above. I have no exact data, but it seems to me that this jack could originate from, say 1950's, as I know of no earlier sources showing one. Actually my sources here are all after 1995 (Albums mainly). Possibly a variant with simplier artistic representation was used before 1990's? (this may indicate somewhat diffferent flags for rank flags in 1995 Album issue.)
Željko Heimer, 20 August 2003


Minister of Defense

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 22 August 2003

Ministro de la Defensa / Minister of Defense - According to the Naval Ceremonial and Protocol Regulations number MAN-EC-CGA-0001-B effective since July 1st, 1997.
Raul Orta, 18 May 2002

According to Album 2000 Corr. 3 [pay03] - Minister of Defence (2:3) - Blue flag with the coat of arms lined with gold lines only and four white five-pointed stars, one in each corner.
This is, as far as I understand, flag prescribed for display on naval ships when MoD is present. This must have been adopted in 1997, since earlier sources show an other one for this purpose - though similar with all-white Coat of Arms in the middle.
Album also show: Minister of Defence (car flag) - Silver flag finged in gold on three sides with the emblem of the Ministry of Defence in the middle and golden inscription arched above and below MINISTERIO DE LA DEFENSA / REPUBLICA BOLIVARIANA DE VENEZUELA. As it is labeled, this is a flag used as car flag, but probably also as the flag/colour of the Ministry as a whole.
Crampton's [cra90f] described Minister of Defence as blue with a styized anchor within 4 stars, all white and the arms in the canton. The MoD flag is unusual with the Coat of Arms in the canton! What exactly did Crampton mean - wouldn't the Coat of Arms cover one star then?
Željko Heimer, 22 and 29 August 2003

Flag at Original Album 2000

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 26 August 2003

In the original Album 2000 [pay00]: Minister of Defence (2:3) - Blue flag with white coat of arms (lined black) in the middle and four white five-pointed stars one in each corner. The corr. 3 introduces the golden coat of arms instead, but weather this is an older pre-1997 pattern or only an errorneus representation, we may never know.
Album 95 [pay] is similar to Album 2000, but the blue used is notably lighter (as also in all subsequent flags), but I do not know how important that is. The flag ratio is drawn as close to 3:4, the ratio that Album 2000 and corr. 3 retain in the images, but provide textually 2:3.
Željko Heimer, 26 and 28 August 2003


Commander General of the Navy

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 22 August 2003

Naval flags of Venezuela in accordance with . Commander General of the Navy is quoted in Pavillon 2001 as 2:3 but measure 4:5.
Martin Grieve, 7 May 2002

Comandante General de la Armada / Commander General of the Navy - According to the Naval Ceremonial and Protocol Regulations number MAN-EC-CGA-0001-B effective since July 1st, 1997.
Raul Orta, 18 May 2002

According to Album 2000 Corr. 3 [pay03] - Commander General of the Navy (2:3) - Blue flag with a white fouled anchor in the middle and four white five-pointed stars, one in each corner.
The drawing show flag as 3:4, so distorting it to 2:3 does not provide for more detailed analysis of the size and disptibution of the elements.
Željko Heimer, 22 August 2003

Flag at Original Album 2000

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 26 August 2003

In the original Album 2000 [pay00]: Commander General of the Navy (2:3) - Blue flag with white anchor in the middle and four white five-pointed stars one in each corner. The corr. 3 showes here very similar flag, the difference being only in the artistic representation of the anchor. Is this older version, or simplification made by authors copying from each other?
The remaining naval rank flags of this pattern (for admirals) already show the anchor patter used latter. Was there a previous verison with the anchor as in this flag?
Album 95 [pay] is similar to Album 2000, but the blue used is notably lighter (as also in all subsequent flags), but I do not know how important that is. The flag ratio is drawn as close to 3:4, the ratio that Album 2000 and corr. 3 retain in the images, but provide textually 2:3.
Željko Heimer, 26 August 2003


Chief of Naval Operations

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 22 August 2003

Comandante Naval de Operaciones / Chief of Naval Operations - According to the Naval Ceremonial and Protocol Regulations number MAN-EC-CGA-0001-B effective since July 1st, 1997.
Raul Orta, 18 May 2002

According to Album 2000 Corr. 3 [pay03] - Chief of Naval Operations (2:3) - Blue flag with a white fouled anchor in the middle and three white five-pointed stars, one above the anchor, one to the hoist and one to the fly.
Željko Heimer, 22 August 2003


Admiral

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 22 August 2003

Admiral is quoted in Pavillon 2000 [pay00] as 2:3 but measure 4:5.
Martin Grieve, 7 May 2002

Almirante / Admiral - According to the Naval Ceremonial and Protocol Regulations number MAN-EC-CGA-0001-B effective since July 1st, 1997.
Raul Orta, 18 May 2002

According to Album 2000 Corr. 3 [pay03] - Admiral (2:3) - Blue flag with a white fouled anchor in the middle and three white five-pointed stars, one in each hoist corner and one in the fly lower corner.
I suppose that default rank of Chief of Naval Operations might be that of an admiral (so 3 stars), and that other admirals use this "default" flag.
Album 95 [pay] is similar to Album 2000. The anchor is also slightly different, including the string that fouls the anchor reaching further up and crossing back the vertical beam of the anchor. Similar anchor graphical represntation is used, if I am not much mistaken, on the rank insignias in the Venezuelan Navy. I wander if this is here a mistake or yet an other pattern of the rank flags used before 1997 (possibly much before).
Željko Heimer, 22 and 28 August 2003


Vice Admiral

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 22 August 2003

Vice Admiral is quoted in Pavillon 2000 [pay00] as 2:3 but measure 4:5.
Martin Grieve, 7 May 2002

Vicealmirante / Vice-admiral - According to the Naval Ceremonial and Protocol Regulations number MAN-EC-CGA-0001-B effective since July 1st, 1997.
Raul Orta, 18 May 2002

According to Album 2000 Corr. 3 [pay03] - Vice-Admiral (2:3) - Blue flag with a white fouled anchor in the middle and two white five-pointed stars, one in the hoist top corner and one in the hoist bottom corner.
The Album has repeated figure number 14 here - the numbers should be corrected in some future correction, though I am sure that there are more important things before that comes to it turn.
As I supposed with 3-star flags, I also guss that all 2-star flags indicate a position of a rank of vice-admiral or equal, at least by default (it is an other thing that the place might be filled temporarily by e.g. a rear-admiral), and that this vice-admiral's flag is used by those Vice-Admirals that do not have any other prescribed flag. We have listed several other variants of the 2-star flag, I believe all reported by Raul Orta following the 1997 regulations: Commander of the Marine Corps (with rifle over the anchor) , Commander of the Fleet Air Arm (with wings aroundthe anchor) and Fluvial Commander (with map of rivers (?) behind the anchor) .
Album 95 [pay] is similar to Album 2000. The anchor is also slightly different, including the string that fouls the anchor reaching further up and crossing back the vertical beam of the anchor. Similar anchor graphical represntation is used, if I am not much mistaken, on the rank insignias in the Venezuelan Navy. I wander if this is here a mistake or yet an other pattern of the rank flags used before 1997 (possibly much before).
Željko Heimer, 22 and 28 August 2003


Rear Admiral

(2:3)
image by Željko Heimer, 22 August 2003

Rear Admiral is quoted in Pavillon 2000 [pay00] as 2:3 but measure 4:5.
Martin Grieve, 7 May 2002

Contralmirante / Rear Admiral - According to the Naval Ceremonial and Protocol Regulations number MAN-EC-CGA-0001-B effective since July 1st, 1997.
Raul Orta, 18 May 2002

According to Album 2000 Corr. 3 [pay03] - Rear-Admiral (2:3) - Blue flag with a white fouled anchor in the middle and a white five-pointed stars in the hoist top corner.
Album 95 [pay] is similar to Album 2000. The anchor is also slightly different, including the string that fouls the anchor reaching further up and crossing back the vertical beam of the anchor. Similar anchor graphical represntation is used, if I am not much mistaken, on the rank insignias in the Venezuelan Navy. I wander if this is here a mistake or yet an other pattern of the rank flags used before 1997 (possibly much before).
Željko Heimer, 22 and 28 August 2003


Part II
Part III